The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following are correct;
If we do something in parallel, can we say;
I work and study( go to the university for example) at the same time?
I do this and that simultaneously?
2. The correct is go to the university or go to a university or go to university?
Thank you in advance

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct;
A back to back game in sports, is a game that someone has to play one day after the other?
Can we use the following sentence;
We have back to back games, so we need to practice and
one day after the other is correct?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

'back-to-back' means without interruption. This could mean one day and then the next day, but that really depends on the situation. Your sentence is correct, though notice the spelling. 'one day after the other' doesn't work as well in this context.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello dear team,
Is the following sentence true: I started learning English since a long time ago.
Thank you

Hello Hosseinpour,

No, I'm afraid that's not quite correct. You do not need the word 'since' in this sentence:

I started learning English a long time ago.

 

Peter

The LeanEnglish Team

Dear Peter,
Hello and thank you for the help, thanks a lot.

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following is correct:
The data is important or the data are important?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

'data' is an English word that comes from a Latin word that is plural. It is followed by both singular and plural verbs, though I'd say the singular form is more common.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to know if the following is correct:
1.I have to work in the basics and the fundamentals in order to succeed in volleyball/ or maths/ or French
2. I have to work in the basics... in order to make a progress in volleyball..

Are the basics and fundamentals correct?
Can I use it with sports as well as lessons?
to make progress in something is correct in this case?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

First of all, I think we would say '...work on the basics' rather than 'in'.

'...work on the basics of... in order to make progress in...' (not 'a progress') is fine.

'...work on the fundamentals of... in order to make progress in...' (not 'a progress') is fine.

Using both terms ('...basics and fundamentals of...') is grammatically fine but is rather repetitive, as the terms have very similar meanings. I would suggest using one or ther other, stylistically speaking.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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