Where can you practise the ways we ask questions in emails? Here, of course!

Enquiries

Consider these things when writing questions.

Subject questions

These questions are about the subject of a sentence:

  • Who takes you to school?
  • Where is your favourite place?
  • What annoys you the most?
  • When is convenient?

Do not add the auxiliary verb 'do' ('do', 'does', 'did'): Who takes you ...? not Who does take you ...?

Yes/no questions

These questions usually only need a short answer like 'yes'/'yes, of course' or 'no'/ 'no, I'm sorry'.

  • Are you ready?
  • Is that convenient?
  • Do you remember me?
  • Can you send me the report, please?

Use the auxiliary verb before the subject: Do you remember ...? not You do remember ...?

Object questions

These questions are about the object of a sentence:

  • Where do you want to meet?
  • Who did you invite to the meeting?
  • Why couldn't you go?
  • How much is this going to cost?

Remember to use an auxiliary verb ('do', 'did', 'have', 'can', etc.): Where do you want to meet? not Where you want to meet?

'Let me know'

When you ask about something in an email, you can use this phrase. It shows that you want to get an answer.

  • Are you coming to the party on Saturday? Could you let me know? Thanks…
  • I would like to attend the training next Tuesday. Please can you let me know the start time?

Task 1

Task 2

Choose the correct preposition for the gaps in the email below.

From: Raj (raj.kumar@stancliffschool.org.uk)
To: Victor Obinna (Victor1997@yesmail.ng)
Subject: RE: pictures from my school

Hello Victor,

Thanks for sending me the pictures of your school and your friends. My school in England is very different! I want to ask you about your school. Here are my questions.

  1. I play cricket in the school team. What sports are you good (1) in / with / at?
  2. I hate maths but I love English. What subjects are you interested (2) in / to / on?
  3. In IT, we're learning how to make a website. At your school, what are you learning (3) about / on / at?
  4. My brother and I walk to school together every day. Who do you go to school (4) to / from / with?
  5. My flat is by a road with lots of cars. What is your home (5) next to / out of / away from?

Can you let me know?

Bye for now! Raj

Exercise

Task 3

Task 4

Download

Language level

Elementary: A2
Intermediate: B1

Comments

I want to speak English Fluently.

Hello Samia,

Welcome! We're glad you found us. If you haven't already, I'd suggest you read our Getting startedFrequently asked questions and House Rules pages, which will help you understand how the site works.

You could also make even more progress in a class with a teacher. You could look at the course offer at the British Council in Oman or, if that's not possible, perhaps find a class at another school.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

dear team,
kindle guide me on the sentence framing pattern of following sentences.I found these in news paper.

1.To make matter worse, mla and his men jumped into the fray.

2.Rather than wallowing in contested detail about the exact benefits of free water, it might be educative to examine important events.

Disposing of a write petition on monday, the court directed to immediately initiate the process.

I didn't get answer of my question

Hello Sramit,

We receive hundreds of questions every week here on LearnEnglish and I'm afraid it's not possible for us to answer all of them. When a question relates to the material on our pages then we always answer. If a question is precise and specific then we are happy to help. However, if the question is about material from elsewhere and is very general (such as 'Explain these sentences for me'), we usually do not answer. Such questions are really for a local teacher to answer.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

THANKS

I confuse between object question and subject question . How can we know when use them ? Thank so much.

Hello Leo 2012,

It depends on you! If you want to ask about the person/thing doing an action then you need a subject question. If you want to ask about the person/thing who is acted upon then you need an object question.

For example, look at this sentence:

The man fed the dog.

To ask about 'the man' I need a subject question:

Who fed the dog?

To ask about the dog I need an object question:

Who did the man feed?

I hope that clarifies it for you.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

I know that could is used in formal questions and can is more informal but in task 4 formal letter there is question using can is it fine to ask question using can in formal email or conversation? I am little confused.

Hello isha94,

'Can' is not necessarily informal and it is fine to use it in formal correspondence. It depends, of course, on the overall tone of the conversation or text and the particular sentence in question.

Best wishes,

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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