The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct:
1.I like blue color or I like the blue color?
2. I like the blue color, you may like orange, he/she may like green.

What is beautiful for anyone is different. Is this expression correct?
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

I'm afraid neither of the sentences in 1 is idiomatic; normally, people say 'I like blue' or 'I like the colour blue'. 2 sounds strange to me because of the modal verb 'may', but if you change 'the blue colour' to 'the colour blue', otherwise it is correct.

I'm afraid I don't understand the last sentence you ask about. It makes me think of the traditional saying 'Beauty is in the eye of the beholder', but I'm not sure that's what you mean.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
Thank you for your reply. Yes" Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Is there an expression in everyday language?
What is beautiful, is different for every person?(is it correct?)
Thank you in advance

Hi agie,

It's true that 'beholder' is not a common word, but that saying is actually fairly common, at least among native speakers. A similar, though not exactly the same, idea is expressed in 'to each their own' -- perhaps that could help you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello dear team,
I was watching a series and it was a robbery scene. The man asked the bank manager: (get the safe open). Is there any difference between (open the safe, and get the safe open).
Thank you

Hi Hosseinpour,

In this context, I'd say there is no difference, I'd say. It really depends on the context; for example, 'get the safe open' could imply 'busting' the safe (i.e. forcing it open) whereas 'open the safe' could imply opening it the normal way with a combination or key.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
What's the difference between an intrastive verb and a stative verb ?
Can you help me understand the difference with one or two examples ?

Hello SonuKumar,

A transitive verb requires an object. You can read about them and see examples here.

An intransitive verb has no object. You can read about them and see examples here.

Some verbs can be both transitive and intransitive. These are called ergative verbs. You can read about them here.

 

Please remember that there is a search facility on the site. If you click on the magnifying glass icon at the top right of the page and search for 'transitive' then you will find these pages for yourself.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask about the following words
When we exercise there is the
inhale and exhale.These are the verbs
Inhalation and exhalation are the nouns. In this case,(the noun) it means the action? how can we explain it?
Thank you in advance

Hello agie,

'Inhalation' is the act of taking air into your lungs.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

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