The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:

[An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother]

[and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.]

Clauses are made up of phrases:

[An unlucky student] + [almost lost] + [a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000]

[when] + [he] + [left] + [it] + [in the waiting room of a London station.]

[William Brown] + [inherited] + [the 1698 Stradivarius violin] + [from his mother]

[and] [had just had it valued] + [by a London dealer] + [at £180,000.]

We can join two or more clauses together to make sentences.

An unlucky student almost lost a 17th century violin worth almost £200,000 when he left it in the waiting room of a London station.

William Brown inherited the 1698 Stradivarius violin from his mother and had just had it valued by a London dealer at £180,000.


 

Comments

Hello,
I would like to ask which of the following sentences is correct
(If I had to choose one place to visit)
1. I would go to Spain and eat paella or
2. I would like to travel to Spain and eat paella?
Which of those 2 sentences is correct?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

Both sentences are grammatically possible but the first option is the better one, I think. The conditon clause asks us to imagine a situation in which we can visit a place, and 'would like' does not require a condition or refer to one specific moment, but is rather an expression of general preference.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir,
It is one of those countries which has
or have much population and little
resource.
In this sentence, should I use 'Has' or 'Have' ?

Hello SonuKumar,

Normally after 'one of' there is a plural noun and a singular verb: 'It is one of those countries which as a large population and few resources.' is what I would recommend.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following is correct
The base of a composition/letter/essay is this; introduction, main body, and conclusion.
Is this sentence correct? Does the word base fit in this case?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

'Base' does not fit here. I think a better phrase would be 'The basic shape'.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Good afternoon from Indonesia. I have a question Sir, how to analyze words in a sentence that has a phrase or clause and how the role in forming a sentence?
Thank u and have a good day

Hello Miracleruntu,

I'd say the first thing to do is to break the sentence up into phrases, and then to put the phrases together into clauses. Sometimes there will be more than one clause in a sentence, but that really depends on the sentence you are analysing.

If there is a specific sentence you'd like to ask us about, please feel free. I think it will be easier to understand a specific example.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,
I would like to ask if the following are correct:
The key to understand your subjects at school is to learn French. Because all the subjects/lessons are in French
1. Is the expression, the key to understand, correct? and in general can, we use this expression?
2. Is the verb to be (are) in French, correct to use it in this case?
Thank you in advance

Hello anie2,

A noun is used after 'the key to', so 'understanding' is the correct form here: 'the key to understanding'. Yes, the verb 'be' is correct in 'the subjects are in French'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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