Topic
Pronouns - personal pronouns (I, me, you etc)

Pronouns are words we use in the place of a full noun.

We have both subject and object pronouns:

 

Subject Object
I me
you you
he him
she her
it it
we us
you you
they them

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We use he/him to refer to men, and she/her to refer to women. When we are not sure if we are talking about a man or a woman we use they/them.

This is Jack. He’s my brother. I don’t think you have met him.
This is Angela. She’s my sister. Have you met her before?
Talk to a friend. Ask them to help you.
You could go to a doctor. They might help you.

Subject pronouns

We use subject pronouns as subject of the verb:

I like your dress.
You are late.
He is my friend
It is raining
She is on holiday
We live in England.
They come from London.

 

Warning

Remember: English clauses always have a subject:

His father has just retired. Was a teacher. > He was a teacher.
I’m waiting for my wife. Is late.  > She is late.

If there is no other subject we use it or there. We call this a dummy subject.

 

 Object pronouns

 We use object pronouns:

• as the object of the verb:

Can you help me please?
I can see you.
She doesn’t like him.
I saw her in town today.
We saw them in town yesterday, but they didn’t see us.

• after prepositions:

She is waiting for me.
I’ll get it for you.
Give it to him.
Why are you looking at her?
Don’t take it from us.
I’ll speak to them

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

pronoun is used in place of noun or noun phrase
but can you give me an example for "I"
john came here by bus but HE went on foot

like that can you replace pronoun "I"

Hello raj jk,

That's a good point! As far as I know, there is no way to do this in the same way as your example sentence. But 'I' can be used to speak about oneself instead of using a name, though of course if we use our name, we'd use a third-person verb. In any case, I'd still say 'I' is a pronoun.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Oh thanks I'm interesting about Cambridge tkt that's why I make lot of trouble you
British council provides it our country I hope to get it
however I care about IElLTS which one the most suitable for me ?
to be a university student and a part time English teacher

Hi. I want to ask that in the sentence "Have you talked to a lawyer? They can tell you your rights". Here "They " is used. Why not he/she? Because a lawyer is a singular countable noun. Please clarify. Thank you!

Hello Akbar Safi,

As is explained above:

We use he/him to refer to men, and she/her to refer to women. When we are not sure if we are talking about a man or a woman we use they/them.

Since both men and women can be lawyers, 'they' is commonly used in a sentence like this one.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you Sir Kirk!

I just did the test to check my English level, and led me to his grammar lesson. I found it very useful even when it would be basic grammar. It took me remember and learn about prepositions. Thanks to the staff

Nice.....I got all of them right !

Dear all, today my first visit this e-learning portal. Could you please advise is here any sources where I can practice English with another student? Thanks in advance

Hello Aibek_u,

First of all, welcome! We're glad you've joined us. If you haven't already, I'd suggest you read our Getting started, Frequently asked questions and House Rules pages, which have advice on how to get the most out of our site.

You're welcome to use this comments space to write to other students. It sounds like our Facebook page might also be of interest to you, so I'd suggest you visit it as well.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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