Topic
Pronouns - personal pronouns (I, me, you etc)

Pronouns are words we use in the place of a full noun.

We have both subject and object pronouns:

 

Subject Object
I me
you you
he him
she her
it it
we us
you you
they them

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We use he/him to refer to men, and she/her to refer to women. When we are not sure if we are talking about a man or a woman we use they/them.

This is Jack. He’s my brother. I don’t think you have met him.
This is Angela. She’s my sister. Have you met her before?
Talk to a friend. Ask them to help you.
You could go to a doctor. They might help you.

Subject pronouns

We use subject pronouns as subject of the verb:

I like your dress.
You are late.
He is my friend
It is raining
She is on holiday
We live in England.
They come from London.

 

Warning

Remember: English clauses always have a subject:

His father has just retired. Was a teacher. > He was a teacher.
I’m waiting for my wife. Is late.  > She is late.

If there is no other subject we use it or there. We call this a dummy subject.

 

 Object pronouns

 We use object pronouns:

• as the object of the verb:

Can you help me please?
I can see you.
She doesn’t like him.
I saw her in town today.
We saw them in town yesterday, but they didn’t see us.

• after prepositions:

She is waiting for me.
I’ll get it for you.
Give it to him.
Why are you looking at her?
Don’t take it from us.
I’ll speak to them

Exercise

Section: 

Comments

They called me different name when i was tengger/ my parents called me baby when I was young

Both are same or not?

Have you talked to a lawyer? "They" can tell you your rights.
I wanted to talk to someone in charge and tell "them" how I felt.

In this exercise I am really confused about these. Can't "He" and "him" come respectively as a correct answer? When is a plural relative noun required for referring to a singular noun?

Hello deviz,

As it says above in the explanation:

We use he/him to refer to men, and she/her to refer to women. When we are not sure if we are talking about a man or a woman we use they/them.

Since we don't know if the lawyer or person in charge is a man or woman, people often use 'they/them'. It's possible to use 'he/him', but this is less and less common.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello,

If I say (Talk to a friend. Ask them for help.) instead of (Talk to a friend. Ask them to help you.) is it right or wrong? And if it is right what is the different in meaning?

Hello Ola Jamal,

There is no difference in meaning here. As the form of the verb is an imperative it is clear who is to receive the help.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

In sentence number 11. Could i say:
-Someone is strange somthing. Don't think about it. It mean don't think about strange.

Hello Aliaksei,

I'm afraid I don't understand what you are trying to say here. The sentence is not correct but I couldn't guess as to how you should say it as I don't know what you want to say.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

hi
i want help to star English learning, when to start? i am facing problem like i know and i don't know English. feel lots of confusion about spellings for example bed or bad, problems with A,I or E in spelling, sentence making problem how to frame? please help me

Hello Ronak Thumar,

I'd recommend you consider a British Council class. If that's not possible, there's some general advice on how to use our site on our Getting started and Frequently asked questions pages. I'm afraid we don't provide individual tuition, but if you have any specific questions about something our site, you're welcome to ask us.

Good luck!

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

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